Sunday, July 01, 2007

sicko

See it. Really. And then come back and let's talk about it. Or better, tell me what you think we should do.

Not everyone agrees with Michael Moore. But he gives a voice to the voiceless like no one else in the last decade. And those voiceless folks are all of us. Except perhaps for you Canadians. In fact, I need to know soon if healthcare is really as rosy as it was portrayed in the movie, because if so, I am putting a deposit on a two-bedroom in Toronto tomorrow.

I've actually got a lot more serious thoughts on this, heartbreaking achy ones but I'll need some time to formulate those and get back to you. Otherwise it'll just sound like loud sobbing from the corner. So for now, I'll just leave you with one of my favorite points: as long as we keep people impoverished, desperate and frightened they'll keep giving away all their power. And that is exactly what they want us to do. Let's take it back. Let's.

See it.

In other news it's time for our seventh Just Post Roundtable. Some of you may be wonderng what was going to happen to our Just Posts with Mad on blogiday, but never fear, justice prevails. Jess graciously offered to be the better half in Mad's absence and I can't thank her enough. We do expect Canada to represent even stronger that you've temporarily lost your home team advantage so bring on those posts.

If you have a written a post about social justice in it's various forms or you've appreciated one that was written by someone else, please send them my way to girlplustwo (at) yahoo(dot) com by June 7th and I'll send you the button. Go on. It's good for the soul and everyone is welcome.

We'll link all posts and anyone who refers one (or more) in our Just Post Roundtable on the 10th. If this is new to you, please feel free to check it out at the Just Post buttons to your right.

29 comments:

Susanne said...

Glad to hear about the just posts. I'll be sending in links shortly.

I'll have to watch the Michael Moore thing some other time...

liv said...

Yeah, I'll need to get on that and see it. But if I get as fired up as in times past, I'll definitely be headed for Nova Scotia. You'll just have to come and see me there.

Mrs. Chicky said...

I'm really looking forward to seeing that movie. And I'm sure, like his last movies, I'll be stunned by what I learn from seeing it.

Lawyer Mama said...

I know I won't be able to see it until it's out on DVD, but it's already on my list of things to see someday. Universal health care (or the lack thereof) is one of my hot button topics.

bubandpie said...

The elephant in the room Moore isn't talking about is wait times. I was just mentioning Whymommy to my mother - talking about how surreal it is to be diagnosed one week, starting chemo the next. "She must be in the States," my mom commented. "She would be waiting months for chemo here."

That's the flaw in the system. And it's a big one.

Tabba said...

I cannot wait to see this movie.

jen said...

bub, and in the movie, there are plenty of canadians claiming no wait at all...which did contradict what i'd heard in the past from some of you.

flutter said...

oh, I can't get started on this. I get a little explosive. I will watch politely.

painted maypole said...

i want to see that movie. Farenhiet 911 was interesting (and I watched when I lived in Bakersfield, CA, so you can imagine how along I felt) and Bowling for Columbine really got me thinking about this whole culture of fear thing.

Blog Antagonist said...

I don't like Michael Moore. Not because of what he says, but because of his attitude. That said, I really am dying to see "Sicko". It's one of my hot button issues. I just hope that it's presented in an intelligent and objective manner.

NotSoSage said...

Haven't seen it yet, but I'll get back to you when I do.

To counter B&P's comment, I have more than one close friend who was diagnosed and then started chemo within days. Yes, the wait times need to be improved (as well as other things) and there are a lot of very stressed out people making very difficult decisions to do with priority setting, but it seems as though those who need it very quickly do get it. And if Mad were here, she would have a whole lot to say about regionalism (and the have versus the have-not provinces) but I'll hold off and a) see the movie first and b) hope that she tunes in soon.

That said, I'll start looking for a place for you as soon as I get the go-ahead. ;)

Jenny said...

It can't really be true...can it?

Aliki2006 said...

I'm a big Moore fan and will definitely see this. And want to talk about it. Lots.

KC said...

I'm hesitant to see this- not just because we haven't seen a first-run movie in probably a year, but because I'm afraid of how one-sided I imagine it might be. That being said, I'm not a fan of HMO's in general and refuse to work for one.

thailandchani said...

It is definitely on my list. Michael Moore may be a propagandist, just as much as the others, but at least his propaganda doesn't nauseate me.

The truth is probably somewhere in the middle and of course a universal healthcare system is going to have glitches ~ but it's certainly better than what we have now.


Peace,

~chani

amusing said...

Haven't seen it yet, but so glad this is the issue he chose to look at. For the working poor, lack of healthcare is terrifying. And the inability to get healthcare is moving into the middle class. After I was divorced, I was turned down (because I get headaches and was taking antidepressents -- doesn't everyone these days?) and then becuase I'd been turned down by one place no one else would even consider me -- not even the place that insures migrant grapepickers!

Panicked.

mamatulip said...

I want to see it. Badly.

Hel said...

My problem with Micheal Moore is he describes problems well but I'm not sure what he is doing towards changing these problems. Does his movies ever change anything?

Heather said...

Hi Jen,

I've lurked here for a few weeks, you're one of a kind in the best way possible. Loved the post about Cambodia, it brings back tearful memories for me of my travels to Africa and the complex feelings those memories evoke.

I haven't seen Sicko yet...

My hope is that Americans who do witness this film are moved enough to start demanding that their candidates have very specific ideas to help thwart some of the problems our system faces.

Michael Moore is certainly good at starting a national dialogue, regardless of the viewpoints he presents or that manner in which they are presented.

Beck said...

I love the Canadian healthcare system, right off the bat - I love that when my uncle was badly injured at work, he didn't lose his house as well as his fingers, unlike a friend's uncle in the States. But the hospitals - at least where I live - are old and run-down, with cracked flooring and wires dangling from the ceiling and 8 hour wait times in the emergency rooms. Everyone I know who needs serious medical treatment done right away gets it done in the States - here you have to wait far, far too long.
So, good but not perfect.

Beck said...

I should have written "everyone I know WHO HAS THE MONEY TO PAY FOR IT gets it done in the States." Obviously, a priviledged group.

Beck said...

I should have written "everyone I know WHO HAS THE MONEY TO PAY FOR IT gets it done in the States." Obviously, a priviledged group.

metro mama said...

Forget healthcare, you should move here for the mommy bloggers. ;)

Kyla said...

I am SO watching Sicko. You know I've got a vested interest in the healthcare.

crazymumma said...

I look forward to this movie.

In my experience, wait times have been ridiculously long or hardly nothing at all. It seems like a random thing.

Overall, i think we are darn lucky.

Jen. I will help you find that home when you need it up here in the big smoke (toronto).

Bon said...

i agree...move here for the mommybloggers. ;)

i'm late to this one thanks to a weekend away, but i will say that wait times for some kinds of care are a significant problem here in Canada, for sure...though i personally - in a very 'have not' province - have been privileged enough to receive excellent and immediate care anytime i've ever needed it, particularly in terms of high-risk prenatal and neonatal services. preventative stuff seems to be where we sometimes fall down - one has to be a squeaky wheel to get seen by a specialist, often, which requires a level of knowledge and confidence that not everyone has. our medicare system is overloaded and bureaucratic and definitely in need of some revamping, for sure. but it's one of the things i value most about Canada, on the whole, and while Moore's likely to portray it in an overly facile and sunshiney way (which irks me, though i appreciate what he's trying to do) it really does beat the ass off a private insurance system, IMO. at least a private insurance system like the US has. Korea has a different model of heavily-subsidized user-pay and private insurance medical which i found far more humane when i lived there.

Momish said...

I can appreciate MM's movies, but boy the man really bothers me. But, I will most likely see the movie, nod my head (a lot), feel the rush of anger and then applaud the man for being so bold and so right.

painted maypole said...

Saw this today (7/6) and really thought it was great. Am thinking about it lots, and will probably do my own post on it soon. Would love to hear what is percolating in your brain about it.

Andrea said...

I dont' think waiting times are the issue.

Yes, for some things, there are waiting times. WAiting a while for treatment here, though, seems preferable to waiting for it forever in the states, if you can't afford it.

The real problem is that the act does not define what is medically necessary, and so this is left up to each province to determine for themselves. Hospital services are universally covered--broken bones, cancer, childbirth, etc. OUT of hospital services are NOT universally covered. Sometimes they are, sometimes they're not.

Here in Ontario, there is no government assistance for type 1 diabetics of working age. Just like most Americans I know, I need to get a good job with good health insurance to be able to pay for the medications and devices that keep me alive. That is because I have a chronic illness that I manage myself, out of hospital. The doctor's visits and lab tests are provided for, but that is a pittance in the total cost of managing this thing. The rest of it I am responsible for myself. The cost without health insurance is approximately $500/month.

It's a damned sight better than what you guys have now. ACute health conditions are well taken care of--you only need to look at the mortality stats to see that wait times are not endangering Canadian lives, by and large. But chronic? In some provinces, yes. In others, no.